Reasoning from a price change at the Fed is endemic!

Reuven Glick, is a group vice president at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. He stated his views here:

Reuven Glick_1

Inflation, as measured by the change in the personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index, was 0.3% in the 12 months through August. Very low overall inflation is largely attributable to lower prices of energy goods and services, which have fallen by over 16% in the past year. Excluding energy as well as the typically volatile food component of spending, core PCE rose 1.3% over the past 12 months. Inflation has remained below the Federal Open Market Committee’s 2% target since mid-2012. Absent further declines in energy prices or a further strengthening of the U.S. dollar, we expect that stable inflation expectations and diminishing slack will push core and overall PCE inflation up gradually towards 2%.

And goes into finer detail:

Reuven Glick_2

In recent years, core services inflation has tended to be positive, except during the recession and the early recovery. Core goods inflation has tended to be negative, with brief exceptions around 2009–10 because of tobacco tax hikes and 2011–12 because of rising textile and apparel costs. In recent months both core goods and services inflation have slowed, that is, services inflation has been less positive and goods inflation has been more negative.

The decline in core goods inflation can be attributed to declining import costs associated with the appreciating value of the dollar as well as lower costs abroad. Because goods account for most international trade, movements in exchange rates and foreign prices tend to exert more pressure on goods prices than on service prices. Lower prices of imported consumption goods directly affect core goods inflation. They also affect goods prices indirectly through imports of raw materials, such as metals, plastic, and rubber, used in the U.S. production of goods for domestic consumers.

Core service inflation has been pulled down by more subdued increases in health-care service costs, which represent a quarter of core services spending and 19% of overall core spending. Health-care services inflation has been slowing for several years and fell off sharply in 2014, primarily from capping of increases in Medicare payments to physicians.

And gets rid of “inconvenient” items:

Reuven Glick_3

The impact of import, energy, and health-care costs on core inflation can be gauged by “what-if” exercises that remove these sectors from the calculation. Excluding relatively import-intensive (for example, apparel and other nondurables) and energy-intensive (for example, transportation) sectors would raise core inflation modestly, by around 0.2%. Removing health-care services spending from the calculations would raise core inflation by an additional 0.3%.

Is he a monetary analyst that contributes to monetary policymaking or a “spreadsheet analyst” that contributes nothing to monetary policymaking?

It seems that it never crossed his mind that inflation is low, and even falling, because monetary policy has been tight, or even tightening!

He never noticed, for example, that headline inflation was dropping long before oil prices tumbled!

Reuven Glick_4

3 thoughts on “Reasoning from a price change at the Fed is endemic!

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