And the “wonk award” goes to…

Ezra Klein presents the “wonk awards” of 2011. Of major interest:

Central bank of the year: Sweden’s Riksbank. It’s hard to avoid noticing that Sweden has dodged the economic woes that are ailing most of the world. Part of the credit here goes to deputy governor Lars Svensson, who spearheaded Sweden’s extremely aggressive monetary policy. In 2009, the Riksbank — Sweden’s central bank — was the first bank to experiment with a negative interest rate. And it had assets on its balance sheet equal to a stunning 25 percent of GDP, a sign of how much cash it was injecting into the economy, compared with just 15 percent for the Federal Reserve. The bold moves worked: Sweden has been growing at a decent clip.

Central bank dissenter of the year: Charles Evans. While some on the Federal Reserve’s board of governors are worried that the central bank is doing too much and risking inflation, Evans has argued that the Fed isn’t doing enough to boost the economy. The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Evans is one of the few bankers who seems to recognize that 9 percent unemployment should, as he put it, set policymakers’ hair on fire as much as a slight uptick in inflation usually does.

Most influential-yet-obscure economic blogger: Scott Sumner. Be honest, how many people had even heard of Nominal GDP level targeting before this year? No one. But as the economy stagnated, and policymakers seemed increasingly incapable of mitigating the pain, many analysts started reading Sumner’s blog with interest. So far, the Federal Reserve has rejected his idea for NGDP target—under which the Fed would essentially target a combination of real output plus inflation rather than focus on curbing inflation alone—but the notion has attracted support from everyone from Paul Krugman to Tyler Cowen to Goldman Sachs. And much of that has to do with Sumner’s near-monomaniacal focus on the topic.

Yes Scott, it was well deserved!

HT David Levey

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5 thoughts on “And the “wonk award” goes to…

  1. “Be honest, how many people had even heard of Nominal GDP level targeting before this year? No one.”

    I had. Samuel Brittan was pushing the idea for all he was worth decades ago, citing James Tobin as his scholarly authority. But all credit to Scott Sumner for reviving interest in the idea and I hope policy-makers pay attention in the year ahead.

  2. Excellent blogging, not just today, but all year by Marcus Nunes.

    The Market Monetarism Movement has done well, but we have some miles to go.

    Sweden is an interesting example.

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